MS Walk ’08

I participated in the MS Walk for the first time this morning, an event to raise funds for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society in their fight against Multiple Sclerosis.

Briefly, Multiple Sclerosis is a degenerative neurologic disease with varying manifestations and varying courses. Some people live with minimal to no recurrences, whereas others suffer severe, debilitating progression leading to rapid death. There is a roughly 2:1 predilection for women, and it typically occurs between the ages of 20 and 50.

Couple reasons I did the walk: 1) I was part of a group walking in support of someone with MS, and 2) I have patients with MS and believe it’s an important area for further research (or maybe “search” is a better term).

The walk in my area was a 6.5 mile route. In talking to people at the registration area, I learned that it was 9 miles last year, 12 the year before, and once was actually 18 miles.

I couldn’t help but think this steady drop in walking distance was related to the steady decline in people’s interest in their health. I’m sure it was also a matter of getting as many people to walk (and thereby raise more money) without turning away people who are weary of physical activity. I wonder: are all charity walk distances on the decline?

You can imagine the comments along the route, too. “Is that only mile four?” “I wonder how much longer it is.” It’s too bad that 6.5 miles is an extraordinary distance for so many people. I don’t expect that everyone be in tip-top shape, but a leisurely 6.5 mile walk should be almost routine.

On average, it takes 2000 steps to walk a mile. The 6.5 mile walk would then require roughly 13,000 steps. There has been a push for the past several years to encourage people to walk 10,000 steps in a day, with pedometers even being handed out at fast-food restaurants (ah, the irony), as a general guideline to increase physical activity. If one can manage 10,000 steps in a day (which isn’t actually that hard – I’ve monitored mine in the past), today’s walk would have been only a 30% improvement in distance from a regular day.

Regardless, thanks to everyone who participated in their local MS Walk or other charity walks, for that matter. Even if you don’t manage to secure a large amount of contributions, your presence is important as a show of support.

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