Archive for the Uncategorized Category

Extended absence

Posted in Uncategorized on July 20, 2008 by Dr. CJ

For those who come to my page and expect to see new posts, thank you!  And, I’m sorry for not creating anything new lately.  I have been overwhelmed (to put it lightly) with other obligations, and I just can’t justify spending spare time on this blog, even though I do enjoy it.
I intend to return to frequent posting in the near future, once I settle into a more normal routine again.  Thanks for being patient, and thanks for those who continue to have an interest in this site.  I certainly have respect for those who maintain blogs with quality postings on a daily basis.  I’ve decided not to pass off poor quality posts simply to post daily.

Why are so many people on chronic medications?

Posted in Medicine, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on May 16, 2008 by Dr. CJ

A recent report revealed that over half of all Americans are on at least one medication on a chronic basis.  This analysis includes children and adults.

The article cites that medications for blood pressure and cholesterol are the most common.  Note that these problems are core features of the Metabolic Syndrome which is already at epidemic levels and steadily worsening.

Best line of the article:

"Honestly, a lot of it is related to obesity," he said. "We've 
become a couch potato culture (and) it's a lot easier to pop a 
pill" than to exercise regularly or diet. 

Another epidemic problem is the overdiagnosis of and over-prescribing of medications for so-called ADHD.  That calls for a separate post, if I dare, but no one can argue that so many children need medication to get through a school day.  That’s flat-out ridiculous and more an indicator of a parent’s ability to teach discipline and maturity than a “disorder” of the child. 

Certainly, there is also an influence from public education.  For example, I frequently see people who have either learned about their risk for certain medical conditions or about medications that are being advertised for these conditions, and this bit of awareness prompts them to initiate a discussion about it. 

There’s room for a long, complicated discussion about the necessity and ethics of pharmaceutical products being used on this scale.  As mentioned previously, I encourage patients to minimize their use of medications by addressing the important health factors

People want quick fixes, and especially easy fixes.  It still amazes me, yes, but people are far more willing to pay $30-100 / month and subject themselves to risk of liver disease, muscle injury, electrolyte depletion, and other side effects than to devote themselves to a regimen of healthy eating and regular physical activity to achieve the same results.

This report also begs the question: why are the doctors prescribing so much medication?  Aside from the obvious increase in chronic medical conditions like hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes; the philosophy of the physician is put to the test when confronted with these patients, as in drug vs. fitness.

Another good reason to have pets – Pets can detect cancer

Posted in Pets, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on May 14, 2008 by Dr. CJ

My wife and I are big-time lovers of dogs.  We have a couple cats, too, but the dogs are our passion.  They are basically our kids for the time being, and they certainly demand that kind of treatment. 

I’ve often wondered what it would be like without them, but that image seems so boring to me.  As much as a handful they can be, there are innumerable moments of bliss as a dog-owner. 

I’m often reminded of a bumper sticker I once saw:

The more people I meet, the more I love my dog.

Here’s another bonus of being a pet-owner.  Just in the last several years, some anecdotes about dogs detecting cancers in their owners have surfaced and have actually prompted some research studies.  The article describes a study for bladder cancers, in which the dogs were trained to sniff the urine and were 3x more successful at detecting presence of cancer than chance alone (41% vs. 14%). 

My favorite part of that study is that one of the so-called “normals”, a healthy control subject was consistently identified by the dogs as having cancer.  Further investigation led to the discovery of a kidney cancer.

Another study demonstrated that dogs were 99 percent accurate in their identification of lung cancer  and 88 percent accurate in identifying breast cancer by breath samples.  Pretty amazing results.  They note, however, that the control subjects were all healthy, and thus it would be important to verify that the dogs could distinguish cancer from some other condition, e.g. infection.

This could be an interesting area of research, particularly if an abnormality can be identified and consistently measured in a laboratory setting.